Posted in general and welcome

What a collection!

Children (and some adults) love to collect things. When I was little, I used to collect any and all stickers, particularly the scratch ‘n’ sniff ones, which I promptly stuck in a photo album. I still have them somewhere and there is still a faint whiff about them. Holly also used to collect stickers, even the BOGOFs and special price labels on clothes, not that you’d ever know from her now-minimalist decor in her room.

Nina Chakrabarti’s fabulous book My Collection of Collections is a fantastic way to encourage a child’s fascination with collecting things and creating stories from objects.

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There are spreads on items in a railway’s Lost and Found department, mugs (that you can decorate by drawing on them or using the stickers in the back of the book), objects that share a common colour (eg blue birds, pegs, beads), edible items and labels, to name but a few.

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There is also a lovely, big envelope to ‘store special tickets, photos or other mementos’ in, so a child can transport this book with them on visits to museums, art galleries, cities, countries – anywhere where they might like to keep items that remind them of a special journey. I used to do a holiday scrapbook with Holly when she was young and we’d keep airline tickets, travel stubs, receipts from restaurants, etc, to accompany the photographs and make the pages more ‘authentic’. This book helps with similar activities, while also providing fascinating information on facts such as ‘Years ago cowrie shells were used as currency’. I love it when I find out something new and interesting! There are also spaces to stick in tree leaves or press flowers towards the back, there is even a spread about enjoying language and adding new and favourite words – examples include: Sassafras, Razzmatazz, Perspicacious, Mumbo-Jumbo, etc.

This really is a lovely and extremely interactive book that is a joy to read and work with. I won’t be putting this in my school library (the children might be too tempted to write in the pages and spoil it for the others) but I will definitely add it to my personal library, unless I start completing it myself soon… now.

Note: Laurence King sent me a copy of this book for review purposes.

 

 

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