Posted in general and welcome, picture books

Stuff and nonsense

Tonight’s review is of Big Brown Bear’s Cave, by Yuval Zommer, published by Templar

bear.jpg

Look at the gorgeous fellow who came with the book!

I love the dedication Yuval Zommer has written in the front of his new picture book:

‘Dedicated to all the kids who barely tidy their rooms.’

I admit I used to be one of those kids, and my husband will, I am sure, pipe up that I am still one when he reads this review.

Big Brown Bear is on the hunt for the perfect home. Well, not explicitly at the beginning – he’s just taking a stroll but then he sees a cave that looks pretty perfect for him so he decides to move in straight away (perhaps it’s a second home). The problem is that the cave doesn’t really feel like home so he carries on his way until he discovers HUMAN CAVES! And, being human, they weren’t just large, dark spaces like bear caves (though they were dusty), they had STUFF in them. Everywhere.

Big Brown Bear comes to the conclusion that where he’s going wrong in his interior design is lack of STUFF so he sets about gathering things for his own cave, particularly anything with handles, wheels or that comes in boxes. He vows to not stop until he has filled every space.

In short, Big Brown Bear has become a hoarder.

Everyone wants to see this Aladdin’s Cave of STUFF but the problem is – you guessed it – there is no space for visitors. And then Big Brown Bear can’t join his friends on a fishing trip because he gets stuck amongst the STUFF (I must say that however bad I am this has never happened to me).

It’s a good thing that Bear has friends who are adept at pulling from all directions because they free him and then help him have a clearance, returning all the STUFF to the human caves. (So if you ever notice large amounts of items go missing from your garage, it could be down to a bear thief.)

Will Big Brown Bear (BBB) finally feel at home?

This book captivated the children at school – they knew before BBB what trouble he was heading towards and chuckled at his silliness. The illustrations are gorgeous and full of colour, texture and movement, and somehow convey BBB’s clumpiness without looking… clumpy (if that makes any sense). The humour is gentle and clear and while the pages are full of STUFF (illustrations!) the text is easy to find and read (I’m not a big fan of writing that goes in all sorts of directions and changes font – it muddles me).

Will this book encourage untidy children to put their STUFF away? I don’t know. My room hasn’t seen an improvement (sorry, Carl). But they do say that a tidy house or room means a tidy mind so maybe I should give it a go.

Now, where did I put that vacuum cleaner?

Please note that Templar sent me a review copy of this book.

Advertisements