A poetic walk

I must apologise for our absence over the last week, and for generally being rubbish these last few weeks at updating the blog. As some of you know, I am studying for an MA in Children’s Literature and we had two essay deadlines to contend with. I can honestly say that it was the hardest thing I have done since Finals but now I have a long summer to enjoy before Year 2 commences. Therefore, I can work on this blog more!

In the meatime, Holly has been reviewing books and the reviews are piling up for me to upload. Before we put those up, we wanted to share with you a walk we went on, on the Bank Holiday weekend. Unusually for the UK, we had brilliant, sunny and warm weather so we took ourselves to a nature reserve at Aston Rowant, which is in the Chilterns, around 15 minutes to the east of Oxford. You can read more about it here. I highly recommend it. There are walks along hills, trees that are great for climbing, a high, flat area for kite-flying and woodlands to walk through.

I’ve added some photos below to hopefully show the variety of the area. However, this wouldn’t be a Childtastic post without something wordy in it! Therefore, Holly and I decided we would write a poem each to reflect the time we had in Aston Rowant and as a special one-year anniversary post, since we’ve not had time to do a proper one!

On Aston Rowant, by Holly Fratter

I watch a flock of sheep go by,

I see flowers swaying in the wind.

I hear the trees rustle from behind.

I love the peaceful happiness on the hill

Where you can wander at your will.

I walk up to the highest mount

On Aston Rowant.

 

A lovely, lyrical poem by Holly. Unfortunately mine does not sound quite so majestic or lovely, as I was immersed in nonsense rhyme at the time for my MA. So what you see below is a result of that!

 

Sheep, by Sam Pope

Sheep like to sit on trees

Except when they scrape their knees

Bark is great for itching fleas.

Sheep.

 

Under trees it feels so cool

Fantastic if you wear real wool

Shade is better as a rule.

Cool.

 

Oh dear! Anyway, enjoy the pictures and we will post again soon!

 

A woodland tunnel at the start of the walk.
A woodland tunnel at the start of the walk.

 

Sheep sheltering under the hawthorn.
Sheep sheltering under the hawthorn.

 

Holly and her dad with the M40 in the background!
Holly and her dad with the M40 in the background!

 

The view, glimpsed through tree bud.
The view, glimpsed through tree bud.

 

Chilled-out tree climbing!
Chilled-out tree climbing!

 

A seat shaped like a red kite - part of the Talking Trail. You can sit in this and crank up an audio 'machine' to listen to stories or poetry or other interesting information.
A seat shaped like a red kite – part of the Talking Trail. You can sit in this and crank up an audio ‘machine’ to listen to stories or poetry or other interesting information.

 

A woodland walk - we came across several wooden sculptures like this.
A woodland walk – we came across several wooden sculptures like this.

 

 

Peekaboo!
Peekaboo!

 

Delicate violets nestling in the grass.
Delicate violets nestling in the grass.

 

The bluebells were gradually starting to come out - they should be at their best soon.
The bluebells were gradually starting to come out – they should be at their best soon.

 

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. judimoore says:

    I’m glad to see you’re giving Holly proper credit for those MA essays ;-}

    Beautiful spring pictures to illustrate two cracking good poems. Thos Hardy and Spike Milligan eat your hearts out!

    Like

  2. Sam says:

    Thank you for the compliments! Thomas Hardy indeed – Holly will be flattered. And I am proud to be likened to Spike! (I presume you meant the comparisons that way around ;-))

    Like

  3. Lovely poems and fabulous pictures. Nice to see the famous M40 cut through the Chilterns from that angle for once!

    Like

    1. Thanks, Griselda! It was nice indeed to see the M40 from that perspective – we always want to climb that hill whenever we drive through it! 🙂

      Like

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